Common Symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma

Posted on September 28, 2020

The nerve that becomes thick or irritated in patients that have Morton’s neuroma is referred to as the plantar interdigital nerve. This condition can produce severe pain and discomfort, and generally occurs between the second, third, or fourth toes. It can develop as a result of wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, or from repetitive impact that can come from participating in running and jumping activities. Common symptoms that many patients experience can include a burning pain in the forefoot, and many people often describe the feeling as having a small stone that is lodged under the foot. If you are afflicted with Morton’s neuroma, please confer with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can effectively treat this condition.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Stephen S. Pirotta of Advanced Foot & Ankle Clinics. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bentonville, AR. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Sesamoiditis and Runners

Posted on September 21, 2020

Sesamoiditis is a common condition among athletes, specifically runners. This condition can occur when there is inflammation present in the tendons of the foot. When sesamoiditis has developed, runners may experience pain in the balls of their feet. Some have described the condition as feeling like they have a rock stuck in their shoe. A sharp or burning sensation in the toe area can also be indicative of sesamoiditis. For a proper diagnosis, and advice on running techniques to prevent his condition, please speak with a podiatrist.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Dr. Stephen S. Pirotta of Advanced Foot & Ankle Clinics. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bentonville, AR. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Different Types of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Posted on September 14, 2020

Diabetic foot ulcers are slow healing wounds that appear on the feet of individuals with diabetes and can become a very serious health issue. Almost a quarter of all individuals diagnosed with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer at some point in their life. There are several types of diabetic foot ulcers, and knowing which type you have can help determine the most effective treatment. Neuropathic ulcers occur when nerve damage from diabetic neuropathy prevents the patient with diabetes from feeling pain from an injury. This allows the wound to progress before you are even aware of it, increasing the risk of infection. Ischemic ulcers may be caused by a lack of blood flow to the feet. These types of ulcers are often difficult to heal. Neuroischemic ulcers are the most difficult to heal and occur in individuals who have both neuropathy and poor circulation. Infected wounds occur in half of diabetic patients with foot ulcers, and require close medical attention. If you have diabetic foot ulcers, it is highly recommended that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you look after your wounds and prevent severe complications.  

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Stephen S. Pirotta from Advanced Foot & Ankle Clinics. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bentonville, AR. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Ways to Prevent Athlete’s Foot

Posted on September 8, 2020

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that causes the skin in between the toes to become itchy, blister, and peel. The fungus that causes athlete’s foot is usually spread in warm and moist environments such as communal showers or public pools. It thrives in sweaty environments as well, and one key way to prevent athlete’s foot is to alternate shoes. Because it takes 24-48 hours for the sweat to dry out in shoes, it is also possible to dry shoes out with a hair dryer. Wearing flip flops or shower shoes while using a communal shower or public pool is another key to limiting the spread and risk of athlete’s foot. Lastly, do not wear other people’s footwear since the fungus can spread via sharing shoes. If you believe that you may have athlete’s foot, it is important to consult with a podiatrist for proper treatment.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Stephen S. Pirotta from Advanced Foot & Ankle Clinics.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bentonville, AR. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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